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Do Not Have a Colonoscopy Until You Learn What Happen to Me

If you are scheduled to have a colonoscopy you will want to know more about the procedure. In this blog, you will learn what is a colonoscopy and what you can expect. This information is to help educate and alleviate the fear of having a colonoscopy.

The following information was provided to me before my own colonoscopy. As always, Best Men’s Health and Lifestyle is committed to improving the health of men through Nutrition, Fitness, and Lifestyle Change. But this information is relative to everyone.

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NOTE: This information is not intended to replace the advice given to you by your healthcare provider. Make sure you discuss any questions you may have with your healthcare provider. 

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Why Would You Need a Colonoscopy?

A colonoscopy is an exam to look at the entire large intestine. The large intestine is examined with a lubricated, flexible tube that has a camera on the end of it and is passed into the colon, and other parts of the large intestine.

You may have a colonoscopy as a part of normal colorectal screening or if you have certain symptoms, such as:

What Can a Colonoscopy Detect?

 A colonoscopy screening can help screen for and diagnose medical problems, including:

Colon Polyps

So what are polyps? Polyps are tissue growths inside the body. Polyps can grow in many places, including the large intestine (colon).  A polyp may be a round bump or mushroom-shaped growth. you could have one polyp or several.

Most colon polyps are noncancerous (benign).  However, some colon polyps can become cancerous over time. Finding and removing polyps early can help prevent this. 

What Will Increase Your Risk of Getting Polyps?

You are more likely to develop this condition if you:

Cause of Polyps

Simply stated, we don’t know what causes most polyps, but we do know that they are most common in adults.

What Are The Signs or Symptoms That You Have Polyps?

Most polyps do not cause symptoms.

However, if you have symptoms, they may include:

How are Polyps Treated?

Treatment for this condition involves removing any polyps that are found. Most polyps can be removed during a colonoscopy. Once removed, the polyps will then be tested for cancer. Additional treatment may be needed depending on the result.

What are the Risks?

Generally, a colonoscopy is a safe procedure. However, problems may occur, including:

What Happens Before the Procedure?

Tell Your Healthcare Provider About:

Eating and Drinking Restrictions

Follow instructions from your healthcare provider about eating and drinking, which may include:

 Bowel Prep

If you were prescribed an oral bowel prep to clean out your colon:

 General Instructions

What Happens During the Procedure?

The procedure may vary among healthcare providers and hospitals.

What Happens After the Procedure?

Follow These Instructions at Home:

Lifestyle

Eating and Drinking

Contact a Healthcare Provider If:

Thank you to the Academy of Medicine for this video that will walk you through What Happens During a Colonoscopy.

Summary

A colonoscopy is an exam to look at the entire large intestine. During a colonoscopy, a lubricated, flexible tube with a camera on the end of it is inserted into the colon and other parts of the large intestine.

Polyps are tissue growth inside the body. Polyps can grow in many places, including the colon. Most polyps are noncancerous (benign), but some can become cancerous over time. Most polyps can be removed during a colonoscopy.

Follow instructions from your healthcare provider about eating and drinking before and after the procedure. If you were prescribed an oral bowel prep to clean out your colon, take it as told by your healthcare provider.

This information is not intended to replace the advice given to you by your healthcare provider. Make sure you discuss any questions you may have with your healthcare provider. 

FAQs

Q: What is a colonoscopy?

A: A colonoscopy is an exam to look at the entire large intestine. The large intestine is examined with a lubricated, flexible tube that has a camera on the end of it and is passed into the colon, and other parts of the large intestine.

Q: Does a colonoscopy hurt?

A: Typically, you will be given a sedative so that you will not feel anything throughout the procedure. If you opt not to have a sedative for whatever reason, talk with your doctor about other options.

Q: At what age should I get a colonoscopy?

A: You should look to get your first colonoscopy at 45. And if all goes well, you will not need to have to done again for another 10 years.

Q: How will I feel after a colonoscopy?

A: You may feel bloated, pass gas, and experience a little bleeding with your first bowel movement. You may also feel a bit groggy from the sedatives. But overall, you will not feel bad and you will be back to your normal self the next day.

Q: How long is the exam?

A: A colonoscopy typically takes 30 minutes, 60 minutes at the most.

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Resource: MedStar Washington Medical Hospital Center Gastroenterology

Image by bodymybody and PublicDomainPictures from Pixabay

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